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Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Nutrition and Skin

I dare you to find a magazine that doesn't reveal some new fad on how to lose weight or the newest superfood (because I have yet to encounter one myself). And because of this sad fact, the whole of the diet and nutrition world can be so confusing.

But we all know how to fix our diets: swap the flour for grains, choose dark, leafy greens, chow on lean protein, and consume enough nuts to be a squirrel. But I believe that there is more drive to eating healthy than wanting to lose weight or developing a nicer looking bod.


Food is fuel. Fuel to get you through your Calculus test, fuel to repair your body during your cardio sesh, and, most of all, for me, to fuel me for the hours I spend en pointe.
Nevertheless, this fuel has more capacity and prowess than one might think. Check your Netflix queue because there, between the raunchy comedies, lay movies that reveal the cures that food boasts for the most common diseases and maladies--namely Hungry for Change and Forks Over Knives.

But, I'm also a beauty blogger and (not to mention) skincare obsessive. So when I shove something in my mouth, I consider two things: the effect this will have on my body and the effect this will have on my skin. My skin, it's the last place on your body to receive nutrients. Feeding my dermis has been the reason I've cut out dairy, went vegan, incorporated algae, etc. Yet, soon enough, eating for my skin and for my body became an obsession and today (and for the last few years), I've been battling the preoccupation.

But, never fear, because I'm conquering a more stable head one forkful at a time, and I am going to demystify the misconceptions about fuel.
Do you really need to take supplements? I thought coconut oil was bad for you because it has so much saturated fat. Is 'juicing' as good for you as the hype suggests? Are carbs really the problem?

Now, I'm not a nutritionist or medically certified, but, because of my condition, I've learned preached nutrition information. So, leave your recommendations, questions, comments, and possible concerns below. So, I'll be waiting, but excuse-moi while I go grab some cashews and green tea, because, darn, those things are good.

16 comments :

  1. Apparently there is no scientific evidence diet affects health.. although most skin care experts (and enthusiasts alike) would say it does. I do too; I definitely notice a difference when I've made bad food choices. I guess there just aren't enough good tests done to prove the effect?


    ANYWAY. I'm really interested in the relationship between diet and skin care so I'm super excited to hear the Q&A from other people.. I only wish I could think of something to ask myself!

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  2. I definitely notice a correlation between what I eat and my skin's condition (tons of junk food is a bad idea!), but I don't think it's as dramatic as what some people have observed. I cut out dairy for a while but now I have a serving a day because in the long-run I really didn't notice a difference in my skin. I try to get the organic, local stuff so maybe that helps too! I think eating as much natural, unprocessed food as possible is key :)

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  3. Food is one that totally shows up on your face, for most people at least. I've started to eat Paleo (plus some dairy) ever since Thanksgiving in lieu of my usual Panda Express and burgers and have noticed a world of difference in my skin.
    I saw someone else mention Chinese Face Mapping and I find that so interesting too!! It's the reason I now take daily probiotics which have also helped.

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  4. I think food makes a big difference in my skin, personally and have come to (regret) realise that skincare can't fix food related problems (sigh, no more sweets). I wanted to ask how long does it take for the consumption of healthy foods to show the effects on the skin? I wish I could think of something else but I can't!

    Hannah | Girl+World

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  5. Oh my, Lara bars are amazing! Great post :)

    http://chelsealeighbeauty.blogspot.ca/

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  6. I've been trying to eat more healthy although tonight I wasn't very good at that. Whoops! Anyway, I can totally see a difference in the way I look and feel when I eat healthy and drink loads of water. You are what you eat after all!
    xx
    Celina | The Celution | Bloglovin’

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  7. Unfortunately, it's so true. xo

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  8. I know; heavenly. My favorites are the chocolate chip peanut, the Cashew Cookie, and the Peanut Butter Cookie. xo

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  9. Ha! You're not alone, chica. I'll add your question to my list for some research (I'm such a nerd--I know). I'm thinking of doing a profile on kale, coconut oil, green tea, etc. How does that sound? xo

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  10. Face Mapping is so intriguing (except most of my spots show on my chin and, apparently, there's nothing I can do about that). I'll definitely talk about dairy in the future. xo

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  11. Agreed! I talked to a dermatologist and she said that the only correlation researchers have found between dairy and breakouts is the hormones in the milk; if you're buying organic and local, you're golden. (: xo

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  12. Wow! I know this helped me--thanks for sharing. xo

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  13. I also think it has a lot to do with the fact that this is a recent, headline topic. As with the rest of the health food industry, it's hard to conduct long term studies because these beliefs haven't been out for very long. (: xo

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  14. i'm a dietitian and i definitely agree with the saying that you are what you eat. whoever doesn't agree with that - well i say to them that they must have not been eating the right foods!

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  15. Yes please, I'd love to know what makes those superfoods "super"!
    Hannah | Girl+World

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  16. Haha; I love that! xo

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